Media Releases

Find out more about our recent discoveries through our media releases

Our researchers have discovered the mechanism that explains how key genetic risk factors cause or protect people from autoimmune disease

New tools for Imaging CoE researchers at the University of New South Wales have built a sensor to measure the membrane charge of our T cells. T cells are the brain of our immune

MELBOURNE, TUESDAY APRIL 4, 2017: Imaging CoE scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system. Human CMV, also known

Engineers at ANU have built an advanced microscope using barcode laser scanner technology that can film moving blood cells and neurons firing in living animals. Lead researcher and Imaging CoE AI Steve Lee, a

Australian researchers are a step closer to understanding immune sensitivities to well-known, and commonly prescribed, medications.

Imaging CoE CI Jamie Rossjohn was awarded the 2016 Victoria Prize for Science and Innovation (Life Sciences) on Tuesday 29 November with his long time collaborator James McCluskey for world-leading research into how the immune system identifies and fights disease.

MELBOURNE, MONDAY 31 OCTOBER, 2016: Every 18 seconds someone dies from tuberculosis (TB). It is the world’s most deadly infectious disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of TB, has infected over one-third of the

New research by Imaging CoE immunologists, based at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, adds another brick to the wall in discovering the immune triggers for celiacs disease. Hugh Reid and Jan Petersen, have been

Peter Doherty Institute and Imaging CoE researchers have made a major breakthrough in understanding how our immune system produces key infection fighting cells.

Australian researchers have applied a new microscopy technique that allows them to monitor the movements of nanoparticles through the inside of a cell They found that drug delivery is more effective when nanoparticles can

An international team of more than 20 scientists led by Imaging CoE scientists has inadvertently discovered how to create a new type of crystal using light ten billion times brighter than the sun.

Imaging CoE scientists from UNSW and Monash have collaborated on a project using powerful imaging technology, they have identified how human immune receptors become activated in the presence of harmful substances. They found that receptors

We all know that a brush with poison ivy leaves us with an itchy painful rash. Now, Imaging CoE and Harvard researchers have discovered the molecular cause of this irritation. The finding brings us a step closer to designing agents to block this mechanism and sheds light on other serious skin conditions, such as psoriasis.

We all know that junk food is bad for our waistline. Now a new study has shown that a diet high in saturated fat begins to harm our immune system before the weight gain

Melbourne researchers have uncovered the genes responsible for the way our bodies fight infection at the point of “invasion” – whether it’s the skin, the liver, lungs or the gut. Research led by Dr

MELBOURNE TUESDAY, 29 MARCH 2016: University of Oxford and Monash University scientists have discovered how proteins present in tick saliva prevent the immune system from running amok. Most of us dread the thought of being bitten

MELBOURNE, WEDNESDAY 2 DECEMBER 2015: The stonefish is one of the world’s ugliest and deadliest fish. You’ll know if you step on one; the fish protects itself using 13 razor sharp venom filled spines

MELBOURNE, TUESDAY 27 OCTOBER 2015: A member of a protein family that is usually associated with immune destruction of virally infected or cancerous cells has been found to control the release from cells of a

MELBOURNE, MONDAY 5 OCTOBER 2015: Challenging a universally accepted, longstanding consensus in the field of immunity requires hard evidence. New research from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging has

Scientists have successfully imaged the immune response at the cellular level, laying the groundwork for significant medical advances.